ARCHIVES

 
9th 
 |  | 7.00pm | Forum Room, Taj President Hotel, Cuffe Parade

The defining feature of this century is the rise of the Asia Pacific: economic, political, military and strategic influence is moving to our part of the world. The reality of this power and influence has arrived faster than many expected or are prepared for. This landscape also includes non-traditional security challenges such as terrorism, piracy, maritime security and natural disasters. For these reasons, Australia and India share a number of strategic interests.

7th 
 |  | 6:30pm | K. R. Came Oriental Institute, Bombay Samachar Marg, Fort

Almost everything around us appears to be disintegrating--institutions, beliefs, values and even individuals. The authority of the Parliament is being challenged by civil society, caste-based khap panchayats are violating the constitution and the Lokpal is likely to become a power centre, larger and stronger than parliament, judiciary and bureaucracy.

16th 
 |  | 9:30am - 5:30pm | YMCA Seminar Room, Colaba

Why a course on thinking? After all, if there is anything that we think we do all the time, it is thinking. But then here is the sad truth: thinking is a skill, is a method, and has to be taught. What does it mean to teach thinking? It is to recognize what thinking is, what happens to us when we think, how we actually think, the different ways by which we think. It is to understand what is meant by critical thinking and creative thinking, to reflect on the different types of thinking and imagining that characterizes art, science and philosophy. It is also to recognize why philosophy is fundamentally about understanding the nature of thinking.

15th 
 |  | 9:30am - 5:30pm | YMCA Seminar Room, Colaba

Why a course on thinking? After all, if there is anything that we think we do all the time, it is thinking. But then here is the sad truth: thinking is a skill, is a method, and has to be taught. What does it mean to teach thinking? It is to recognize what thinking is, what happens to us when we think, how we actually think, the different ways by which we think. It is to understand what is meant by critical thinking and creative thinking, to reflect on the different types of thinking and imagining that characterizes art, science and philosophy. It is also to recognize why philosophy is fundamentally about understanding the nature of thinking.

14th 
 |  | 9:30am - 5:30pm | YMCA Seminar Room, Colaba

Why a course on thinking? After all, if there is anything that we think we do all the time, it is thinking. But then here is the sad truth: thinking is a skill, is a method, and has to be taught. What does it mean to teach thinking? It is to recognize what thinking is, what happens to us when we think, how we actually think, the different ways by which we think. It is to understand what is meant by critical thinking and creative thinking, to reflect on the different types of thinking and imagining that characterizes art, science and philosophy. It is also to recognize why philosophy is fundamentally about understanding the nature of thinking.

 
8th 
 |  | 6:30pm | Rangswar Hall, Y. B. Chavan Centre, Nariman Point

Ashis Nandy will trace how the ideas of an Asian future--note the singular--and that of the diverse but compatible futures of Asian societies during colonial times have gradually given way to a uniform, steamrolled future created through a globalized idea of development where even isolated, impotent, symbolic dissent from such a future is feared as dangerous threat and a security hazard. The example and success of Japan has prompted China and India to opt for a similar model of development and they too have been conspicuously successful in their efforts in recent times.

 
28th 
 |  | 9:30am - 5:30pm | YMCA Seminar Room, Colaba

This course in Art History traces the idea of the ‘modern’ (itself an infinitely vexed and much contested category) as it manifests through linguistic, thematic, conceptual as well as stylistic shifts from the terminal stages of the courtly traditions to the advent of new practices around the nineteen forties. The course does not intend to be overtly theoretical, save where such deductions evolve from the material of our concern, the visual images themselves; it would rather be an exercise in ‘looking’ at art and attempting to ‘read’ them contextually.

 
27th 
 |  | 9:30am - 5:30pm | YMCA Seminar Room, Colaba

This course in Art History traces the idea of the ‘modern’ (itself an infinitely vexed and much contested category) as it manifests through linguistic, thematic, conceptual as well as stylistic shifts from the terminal stages of the courtly traditions to the advent of new practices around the nineteen forties. The course does not intend to be overtly theoretical, save where such deductions evolve from the material of our concern, the visual images themselves; it would rather be an exercise in ‘looking’ at art and attempting to ‘read’ them contextually.

 
26th 
 |  | 9:30am - 5:30pm | YMCA Seminar Room, Colaba

This course in Art History traces the idea of the ‘modern’ (itself an infinitely vexed and much contested category) as it manifests through linguistic, thematic, conceptual as well as stylistic shifts from the terminal stages of the courtly traditions to the advent of new practices around the nineteen forties. The course does not intend to be overtly theoretical, save where such deductions evolve from the material of our concern, the visual images themselves; it would rather be an exercise in ‘looking’ at art and attempting to ‘read’ them contextually.

 
5th 
 |  | 6:30 pm | Rangswar Hall, Y. B. Chavan Centre, Nariman Point

Legacies of historic migrations have had a profound impact on life in Asia, whether they be in small or large numbers, triggered by war, politics, or economic necessity. Today, movements within and between countries have increased manifold magnifying previous effects and creating new ones. James Farrer will discuss how migratory shifts have led to a more cosmopolitan society in China, and lessons China holds for Asia overall. Access to wealth and influence from outside cultures is changing the fabric of China’s society. In a country where emphasis on the homogenous Han Chinese culture has remained dominant, centuries old mores are being tested by the influx of popular culture from around the world. Issues like the one child policy and censorship have had a profound impact on this generation, and the youth of China grapple with increased access to information and economic parity on the world stage. What makes Chinese youth culture unique today? How has it borrowed from its neighbors, and what remains exclusive to Chinese culture? What has caused the surge in youth culture and creativity, and how does this movement help to set them apart from their parents’ generation? How have the modern and ancient fused to create new patterns of social interaction?

 
3rd 
 |  | 6:30 pm | Goethe Hall, Max Mueller Bhavan, Kalaghoda

What kind of conceptualization did Marxism represent? And how to revisit that to achieve a reflective relationship to the present? Vivek Dhareshwar will set out a framework for understanding the trajectory of Marxism in India through a deliberation on the three terms of the title: Critique, Genealogy and Reflective Action.

 
13th 
 |  | 6.30 pm | Rangswar Hall, Y. B. Chavan Centre, Nariman Point

As countries in Asia experience unprecedented economic growth, they are also grappling with capacity challenges in areas extending from housing, food and water security, to education. Moving forward, Asia’s challenge will lie in remaining cognizant of this dichotomy, and in adapting to ensure its goals for economic and human development are both met. Where does the future of Asia lie? How can it address its multiple challenges, optimize its progress, and apply lessons from other regions?